Wrist Joint Injection Procedure

What is a Wrist Joint Injection Procedure?
This is an injection into the wrist joint, which is the likely cause of your pain.

Why is a Wrist Joint Injection Procedure helpful?
It is helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of your pain, which is likely due to a disorder of your wrist joint. Two medications are used for the injection: a shorter-acting local anesthetic numbing agent and a longer-acting anti-inflammatory steroid agent. You will likely experience temporary pain relief after the injection due to the shorter-acting local anesthetic numbing agent. Then, you will likely experience longer pain relief after the injection due to the longer-acting anti-inflammatory steroid agent.

What happens during a Wrist Joint Injection Procedure?
You will be asked to get into a comfortable position on the procedure table. The skin at the site to be injected will be prepared with a cleansing solution. You will experience an initial sting at the injection site as the very small procedure needle is introduced through the skin into the wrist joint. Then, the clinician will inject the medications into your wrist joint. The injection procedure itself is brief, usually lasting less than 5 minutes.

What happens after a Wrist Joint Injection Procedure?
You will be observed for your response to the injection. You may become a little sore at the soft tissues of the procedure site, which is normal and to be expected. You may apply an ice-pack to the sore area of the procedure site. The soreness at the procedure site should go away in a couple of days. It usually takes 48 to 72 hours to experience relief of your wrist pain from the longer-acting anti-inflammatory steroid agent. A follow-up appointment will be made for you.

Can I go to work the next day after a Wrist Joint Injection Procedure?
You can return to work the next day.

Don't let the pain get worse. Schedule an appointment today at Comprehensive Pain Specialists. Talk to your physician about making an appointment with Comprehensive Pain Specialists today. We have 40 locations in 10 states.

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